A ray of hope after a brutal week

A multicultural student haka in New Zealand radiates something positive in a world that seems all too sick

A ray of hope after a brutal weekWhen you write a weekly column in the relatively unrelated realms of culture and politics, you rely on independent stimuli for the idea that eventually becomes the piece. Frankly, the idea that becomes the column doesn’t often strike until just after the previous week’s work appears online each Sunday morning. Then, as if ordained by…

We can escape the heart of darkness and violence

In Christchurch, South Carolina, Pittsburgh and elsewhere, we've seen what hate brings if we don't find common ground

We can escape the heart of darkness and violenceOne of Charles Dickens’ most beloved books is A Tale of Two Cities. The novel focuses on several characters, including Dr. Alexandre Manette, who was imprisoned in the Bastille in Paris, France, for 18 torturous years. His long-held desire was to join his daughter, Lucie, a brilliant physician who lived in London, England, and had…

Canadian fraud risks increasing in a complex digital landscape

If you think there's something wrong, there probably is, says Interac

Canadian fraud risks increasing in a complex digital landscapeIt’s Fraud Prevention Month in Canada and Interac Corp. has launched some tools to help Canadians not get scammed. The company said 71 per cent of Canadians said in a survey that they  feel confident in their ability to detect a phishing scam. But Interac Corp. also found that 96 per cent were unable to identify…

Municipalities must protect against cyber attacks

Canadian towns and cities hold valuable data yet are poorly prepared to detect and fend off attacks

Municipalities must protect against cyber attacksCybercriminals have caught Canadian municipalities flat-footed. Our cities must get with the times or send more taxpayer money and private data out the door. Cybercrime costs Canada $3.12 billion a year. A portion of that involves ransom payments to cybercriminals who digitally hold computers hostage. Ransomware, which involves remotely encrypting hard drives and demanding money…

Food inspectors getting tough on olive oil fraud

Food fraud affects many food categories, but stakes are a little higher with olive oil due to potential allergens in substitute ingredients

Food inspectors getting tough on olive oil fraudOlive production in Italy was hard hit last year due to an early frost. The country’s production dropped by 57 per cent. Greece and Portugal suffered similar fates, along with pest issues, and saw their production drop by 35 and 15 per cent, respectively. Short food supplies generate economically-motivated adulteration, that is, adding a inferior…

Protect yourself against the rising tide of tech-based scams

Just like we change the batteries in our smoke detectors annually, so should we change all our passwords

Protect yourself against the rising tide of tech-based scams“There’s a sucker born every minute,” 19th-century showman P.T. Barnum reportedly said. In fact, the notion predates Barnum – and is just as applicable in the modern era. Con artists take advantage of our default desire to trust. They know how to manipulate people into doing something that under normal circumstances they should be wary…

Cleaning up Vancouver’s “rat’s nest of rot”

Single-family houses in the city are now deposit boxes. How did we get here and how can we restore balance?

Cleaning up Vancouver’s “rat’s nest of rot”It’s time for broad review of the dirty money games played in the casinos and on the high streets of the raincoast’s ‘capital' city. B.C. Attorney General David Eby recently reported that upwards of $2 billion in dirty money laundering has occurred in Vancouver casinos and luxury real estate over the past year. He characterized…

Four things Canada’s top spy didn’t say

David Vigneault’s recent speech was a slick deflection and thinly-veiled push for broader surveillance

Four things Canada’s top spy didn’t sayWhen David Vigneault addressed the Economic Club, the nation's intelligence chief acknowledged his agency's first rule: “Don't talk.” True to form, he said little in his tightly-scripted remarks on Dec. 4. What the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) director left out, though, amounted to glaring omissions. His remarks were misleading at best, dishonest at worst.…

Senior citizens become drug mules as the result of a growing scam

Who is a customs agent more likely to search: a 70-year-old granny carrying a bag of sweets or a scruffy 25-year-old guy?

Senior citizens become drug mules as the result of a growing scamThere are three main methods con men use to trick their mark. They try to gain their sympathy, take advantage of greed, or threaten or extort. If you’re in the wrong frame of mind, your critical thinking skills might shut down. You see and hear what the con man wants you to. But if a…

One sentencing standard for all offenders

Terri-Lynne McClintic shouldn't have been sent to a healing lodge. In fact, the very nature of such institutions defies fair practise

One sentencing standard for all offendersTerri-Lynne McClintic, convicted of the 2009 abduction, rape and murder of eight-year-old Tory Stanford, was recently moved from federal prison to a healing lodge. Canadians were surprised – to say the least – that the transfer of a convicted child murderer to a healing lodge was not something new but had being going on since…
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